Tag: compensation

UK Supreme Court Limits Compensation for People with Quashed Convictions

On 30 January 2019, the UK Supreme Court held 5-2, in the case of R (on the application of Hallam) v Secretary of State for Justice [2019] UKSC 2, that people convicted of criminal offences, who have their convictions subsequently overturned, had no right to compensation unless they could demonstrate that the new evidence proved ‘beyond reasonable doubt‘ that they had not committed the offences.

The Appellant in this case spent about seven years in prison before his conviction was eventually quashed for being unsafe in light of newly discovered evidence. He then applied for compensation under section 133 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 (as amended by section 175 of the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014). The entitlement to compensation under Section 133 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 is based on the concept of ‘miscarriage of justice’ which is defined under section 133(1ZA) of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 as occurring ‘if and only if the new or newly discovered fact shows beyond reasonable doubt that the person did not commit the offence‘. The Appellant’s application for compensation was refused by the Secretary of State for Justice on the grounds that, inasmuch as newly discovered evidence cast doubt on his conviction as to render it unsafe and therefore resulted in quashing, it did not prove beyond reasonable doubt that the Appellant had not committed the offence. The Appellant brought judicial review proceedings against the decision claiming that the requirement contained in section 133(1ZA) of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 was incompatible with the presumption of innocence under Article 6(2) of the European Convention on Human Rights.

In the majority opinion written by Lord Mance, the five Justices held that based on the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights, most notably the case of Allen v UK (App. no. 25424/09), the requirement contained in section 133(1ZA) of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 did not breach Article 6(2) of the European Convention on Human Rights. The case was concerned with claims for compensation where new evidence rendered the conviction unsafe because, had it been available at the time of trial, a reasonable jury might or might not have convicted. This type of claims also falls short of the requirement contained in section 133(1ZA) of the Criminal Justice Act 1988, yet the European Court of Human Rights did not consider it incompatible with Article 6(2) of the ECHR. Even though Allen v UK (App. no. 25424/09) was never concerned with the requirement to prove innocence beyond reasonable doubt itself, the reasoning of the European Court of Human Rights prompted the majority in R (on the application of Hallam) v Secretary of State for Justice [2019] UKSC 2 to uphold section 133(1ZA) of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 and confirmed that the Appellant had no right to compensation despite spending seven years in prison.

Lord Reed and Lord Kerr dissented. Lord Reed, with whom Lord Kerr agreed, accepted that compensation could be denied under Allen v UK (App. no. 25424/09) in cases where new evidence rendered the conviction unsafe because, had it been available at the time of trial, a reasonable jury might or might not have convicted, but argued that section 133(1ZA) of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 was nevertheless incompatible with the presumption of innocence under Article 6(2) of the ECHR, because it effectively required the Secretary of State for Justice to decide whether persons, whose convictions had been quashed, established that they were innocent (para 187).

Given the outcome of the case, it is possible that the European Court of Human Rights will have a final say on the issue.